Who needs home care?


1. Approximately 5.9 million. people – almost 17% of the population – are age 65 and older. 1
2. An estimated 3.3 million Canadians will be age  80 and older by  2036, more than double the current figure.1
3. For the first time in history, the number of seniors (5.9 million) now exceed the number of children aged 14 and younger (5.8 million). The senior population is expected to continue its rapid increase until 2031, when the last baby boomers reach age 65.1
4. By  2036, the number of Canadians age 65 and older could range from , 9.9 to 10.9 million people, representing 23% – 25% of the population.1
5. Nearly half of Canadians aged 65 and older have two or more chronic health conditions.2

Source(s):

1. Statistics Canada
2. Ontario Association of Community Care Access Centres. Health Comes Home: A
Conversation about the Future of Care – Part 1. Toronto, Canada: Ontario Association of
Community Care Access Centres; 2013.


Who provides home care?


1. An estimated 3.8 million Canadians aged 45 and older provide informal care to a senior with a short- or long-term health condition.1
2. Just over half (56%) of informal caregivers are assisting their parent or parent-in-law. Another 19% are caring for a neighbour or friend, and 11% are providing care for their spouse.1 3.Nearly three-quarters (73%) of those Canadians providing informal senior care are between the ages of 45 to 64.1
4. One in six Ontarians aged 45-64 reported managing another person’s care needs, including assisting with personal care and medication 2
Source(s):1. Statistics Canada.
2. Ontario Association of Community Care Access Centres. Health Comes Home: A
Conversation about the Future of Care – Part 1. Toronto, Canada: Ontario Association of
Community Care Access Centres; 2013.


Who needs help?



1. More than half of informal caregivers reported feeling worried or anxious (55%) and tired (51%) during the past 12 months due to their caregiving responsibilities. Just over one-third reported feelings of irritability (36%), being overwhelmed (35%) and having interrupted sleep (36%).1
2. Approximately 43% of informal caregivers have their work disrupted – arriving late, leaving early and/or having to take time off because of their caregiving responsibilities. About 15% reported having to reduce their weekly hours of work.1
3. About 44% of caregivers incur extra financial costs associated with caregiving responsibilities, such as decreased salary pay due to absences; lost promotion opportunities; and reduced retirement and health benefits.3
4. Nearly half of caregivers (45%) of seniors with dementia report symptoms of caregiver distress – almost double as those caring for a senior without dementia (26%). 2
5. More than 10% of seniors receiving care reside with their children, with this proportion being highest for seniors age 85 and older.1

Source(s):  
1. Statistics Canada
2. Unpaid caregiver challenges and supports. Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), 2018.
3. Economic Security for Caregivers:  A Policy Development Process to Better Support Unpaid Caregivers, a report from the Unpaid Caregiving  Forum, convened by the Canadian Association for Community Living (CACL) in partnership with The Canadian Caregiver Coalition (CCC-CCAN), 2003