Woodbine – Lumsden

Senior Care services Woodbine - Lumsden
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Woodbine – Lumsden

About Woodbine Lumsden:

Home Instead Senior Care not only provides in-home care for residents in Woodbine Lumsden but is located right in the neighbourhood, just south of the Danforth on Woodbine Ave.

Woodbine Lumsden is a neighbourhood of Toronto in the east end, which is bounded by Woodbine Avenue to the west, Main Street to the east, O’Connor Drive and Taylor Creek Park to the north.  The Canadian National railroad tracks running just south of the Danforth Avenue mark its southern boundary.

Woodbine Lumsden Area Ammenities for Seniors:

Transit:

Woodbine and Main TTC stations are the closest to subway stops in the neighbourhood,  and connect to east/west subway trains. Main Street station is wheelchair accessible.

Buses to the area are from Broadview station (routes 62 and 87), and north from Woodbine Station (route 91).

Danforth Go Train Station (at 213 Main St. south of Danforth) is only partially wheelchair accessible.

Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416-393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416-393-4222.

Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416-481-5250.

Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999.

Non-Medical transportation for Seniors to important appointments can also be arranged with accompaniment through your local Home Instead office.

Libraries:

Main Street (at 137 Main St south of Gerrard) 416 393-7700, S. Walter Stewart (at 170 Memorial Park Ave) 416  396-3975 and Danforth/Coxwell (at 1675 Danforth Avenue) 416 393-7783 branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs. 

Parks, Community Centres:

Taylor Creek Park follows a major tributary to the Forks of the Don River. Three rivers meet at the forks and form the Lower Don River: the East Don, the West Don and this tributary. Known by several names over the years (Taylor Creek, Massey Creek and Silver Creek), its mature forests, scrub communities and marsh habitat support a diversity of wildlife and regionally rare plants make it ideal for hiking, walking, off-road cycling and snowshoeing.   Vehicles can enter Taylor Creek Park at Don Mills Road, Haldon Avenue or Dawes Road.

Stan Wadlow Park (at 373 Cedarvale Ave)  (416) 396-2847 is a 8.5 hectare park near O’Connor Avenue and Woodbine Avenue featuring a Kiwanis outdoor pool, the East York Memorial Arena, the East York Curling club, ball diamonds, a sports field, a dog off-leash area, a splash pad and a children’s playground.

Main Square Community Centre (at 245 Main St) is a 3-level facility with a 25 metre pool and two multipurpose area with a wide range of programming for seniors like Cardio for Older Adults and Osteofit for Aduts 60+.  416 392-1070.

Community Centre 55 (at 97 Main Street and Swanwick Avenue) has community-based programs like free Tax Clinics, Flu Shots, Seniors’ Yoga, Fitness and a Book Club.  416 691-1113.

O’Connor Community Centre (at 1386 Victoria Park Avenue and O’Connor) recently reopened, and has a free gym, weight room and an outdoor pool.  They offer special programs for adults 60+ like Line Dancing (country, latin and sequence – and partners not required), Visual Arts(drawing, painting, and pottery)and Cardio.  They also have a Drop in social time for Adults 55+.  416 395-7957.

WoodGreen Community Services – Community Care and Wellness for Seniors (at 840 Coxwell Ave. near Mortimer) is a Community Centre for older adults offering Day Trips, Income Tax Clinics, Luncheons, Blood Pressure Clinics and Foot Care Clinics.  416-467-1166.

East York Civic Centre (at 850 Coxwell Avenue near Mortimer Avenue) was the municipal office of the former Borough of East York, until amalgamation.  It now houses various committee offices and city services department for residents of East York. A farmer’s market takes place at the Civic Centre from May to November.

Harmony Hall Centre for Seniors (at 2 Gower Street) is a multicultural community centre specializing in transportation, recreation, education, wellness and support services for seniors and adults with disabilities.  Programs for seniors are in English, Chinese, Tamil and Bengali and bring all four groups together to promote cultural harmony. The objectives are to enhance the physical, psychological, social and cultural well being of seniors and adults with disabilities;  help seniors and adults with disabilities gain access to appropriate health and social services and to encourage the meaningful participation of seniors and adults with disabilities in the community.  416 752-0101.

Neighbourhood Link Support Service (at 3036 Danforth Avenue) offers an Adult Day Program, Akwasti Program (translated from Huron-Wendattra, it means “in the inner beauty of happiness, they grow old), Chinese Programs, Client Intervention and Assistance, Congregate Dining, Meals on Wheels Program, Respite Service and Caregiver Relief, Security Checks, Social and Recreational Programs.  It t is a community-based care and support program provided through recreational activities for frail seniors and those with cognitive impairments to minimize their isolation and promote their physical and emotional health in a safe and friendly environment.  416 691-7407.

Ethiopian Association in the GTA (at 1950 Danforth Ave near Woodbine Ave) offers Seniors Outreach and Recreation, Networking, Referrals, Cultural programs and Workshops, Facility is not wheelchair accessible 416-694-1522

Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare: 

The nearest hospital is Toronto East General Hospital (located at 825 Coxwell Avenue and Sammon Avenue) has an emergency department.  416 461-8272.

Parkview Hills Rehab & Wellness Clinic (at 2648 St Clair Ave E) offers Physiotherapy, Registered Massage Therapy, Chiropractic, Laser Therapy, Reflexology and Nutritional Training.   (416) 759-8099

 Appletree Medical Group (at 1450 O’Connor Dr and Bermondsey Road) has a walk-in medical clinic.  647-722-2370

East York Medical Health Centre (at 45 Overlea Blvd, on the lower level of East York Town Centre) provides medical and diagnostic care including Dermatology, Cardiology, Rheumatology, Neurology, Gynecology, Urology, Chiropractic Care & Rehabilitation, X-rays, Stress Echos & Exercise Stress Testing, Bone Density Testing, Holter Monitoring  and more. 416-696-9836.

Did you know?

Kids under 14 and Seniors each make up 14% of the population of Woodbine Lumsden, while Youth represent 10% and working age Adults are 63%. 
The neighbourhood is transitioning from having a high percentage of seniors to being a popular place for couples to buy along the subway line.

81% of Woodbine/Lumsden residents speak English at home.

The vast percentage of homes in this area are single detached.

Woburn

Senior Care services Woburn
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Woburn

Wexford

Senior Care services Wexford
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Wexford

Victoria Village

Senior Care services Victoria Village
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Victoria Village

About Victoria Village 

Home Instead Senior Care  provides in home care for residents in Victoria Village in the North York district of Toronto

The boundaries are The Don Valley to the west, Victoria Park to the east, Lawrence to the north and Eglinton to the south (though there is a small area south of Eglinton to Sunrise Avenue sometimes included).

Victoria Village is sometimes referred to as Victoria Park Village or Sloane, and has a mixture of high and low rise apartments and some bungalows.  It is a community in transition as a steady stream of young families have begun moving into this affordable neighbourhood.

Victoria Village Area Ammenities for Seniors

Transit:

There are no TTC subway stations near Victoria Village, however a new stop will be available once the Eglinton Cross town line becomes active.

Buses can be taken from several stations on the Bloor/Danforth and Yonge lines.  Options are east along Eglinton from Eglinton Station (route 34), east along Lawrence from Eglinton Station (route 54), north from Victoria Park Station (route 24), east along O’Connor from Coxwell Station (route 70) and from Woodbine Station up to Sloane (route 91). Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416-393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416-393-4222. Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416-481-5250. Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999. Non-Medical transportation for Seniors to important appointments can also be arranged with accompaniment through your local Home Instead office.

Parks, Community Centres:

Edwards Gardens (at 755 Lawrence Ave E at Don Mills Road) is a former estate garden featuring  formal gardens and brilliant floral displays, rock gardens, a greenhouse, wooden arch bridges, a waterwheel, fountains, and many walking trails.   It is home to the Toronto Botanical Garden which offers programs in botanical art, floral and garden design, horticulture, gardening, urban agriculture, beekeeping, and more.  There are lecture series, courses, events and a library to enjoy as well as lovely gardens that are partially wheelchair accessible.  Sunnybrook Park (at 1132 Leslie, north of Eglinton Avenue) is a 154 hectare park located on a country estate north of Leaside and south of the Bridle Path.  There are bike trails, dog parks and the Sunnybrook Stables and fields (now used for sports and recreation).   It is listed as a top spot in the city to see birds in the City’s Birds of Toronto Biodiversity Series booklet. E.T. Seton Park (at 73 Thorncliffe Park Dr) is located next to Ontario Science Centre and is named the Scottish-Canadian author, wildlife artist and founding member of Boy Scouts of America.  This park offers a beautiful setting for a hike, bike ride or cross-country ski along the West Don River Trail.  There is a free archery range and a disk golf course.  A range of wildlife (red squirrels, eagles, deer and birds) can be seen here and the park is also listed as a top spot to see birds in the city’s Birds of Toronto Biodiversity Series booklet. Victoria Village Arena (at 190 Bermondsey Rd, south of Eglinton and east of the DVP) has an indoor rink and a newly added partially accessible gymnasium.  416 395-7955. Wigmore Park (at 106 Wigmore Dr near Eglinton Avenue East and Victoria Park Avenue) is a 4.3 hectare park featuring a ball diamond and a children’s playground. The south end of the park has a tributary to the East Don River emerging and flowing west down the ravine into the Charles Sauriol Conservation Area. Charles Sauriol Conservation Area (at 1 Old Lawrence Avenue) lies between the Forks of the Don and Lawrence Avenue East and includes the Elevated Wetlands (an experimental water purification project).  Charles Sauriol was born in Toronto and spent a lot of his boyhood camping out in the Don Valley with his Boy Scouts troop, which inspired his commitment to help protect the valley for future generations. Bond Park (at 120 Bond Ave, north of Lawrence Avenue and west of Don Mills) is a 6.8 hectare park with ball diamonds, tennis courts and a club house. Moccasin Trail Park (at 55 Green Belt Drive) is a 15 hectare park at Lawrence Avenue East and the DVP with walking paths through a naturalized ravine forest.

Libraries:

The Victoria Village (at Sloane Avenue and Sweeney Drive) 416  395-5950, Don Mills (at 888 Lawrence Ave E), Fairview (at 35 Fairview Mall Drive), 416 395-5750,  Pleasant View (at 575 Van Horne Ave), 416 395-5940, Hillcrest (at 5801 Leslie Street) 416 395-5830 and  Flemingdon Park (at 29 Dennis Drive) 416 395-5820 branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs. 

Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare:

The nearest hospital is Sunnybrook Hospital (at 2075 Bayview Avenue north of Lawrence) has an emergency department.  416-480-6100.

Another is North York General Hospital (at 4001 Leslie St,  north of Sheppard Avenue in North York).  416-756-6000.

Don Mills Medical Clinic (at 825 Don Mills Rd at Eglinton Avenue East) is a wheelchair accessible walk in clinic.

Harmony Ensure Health Place (at 2088 Sheppard Ave E) is a professional pain relief clinic.  416 839-1378

Did you know?

Much of the neighbourhood was originally owned by the Heron family, who operated an orchard on the property (many apple trees can still be found in the neighbourhood). The area was developed in the 1950s by a group of investors led by MP Robert Henry McGregor.

Victoria Village’s 2011 population was 17,182 (and 7,280 households).  There are slightly more females 54% vs males at 46%.  Seniors 65+ make up 18% of the population (slightly higher than the rest of Toronto at 14%).

Upper Beaches

Senior Care services Upper Beaches
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Upper Beaches

About the Upper Beaches Area

Home Instead Senior Care  provides in-home non-medical care for residents of the Upper Beaches.

The Upper Beaches is bounded by Coxwell Avenue to the west, Victoria Park to the east, the CN Railway tracks to the north and Kingston Road to the south. 

The Upper Beaches are ideal for people who enjoy easy access to the bussle and beauty of the Beach and the convenience of The Danforth. 

The name “Upper Beaches” was first used by real estate agents and developers in the early 2000s as a marketing tool.  The area was never considered part of the Beach neighborhood, but was close to it. The city’s current name for this area is “East End Danforth“, though that is rarely used.

Upper Beaches Ammenities for Seniors

Transit:

Coxwell, Main and Victoria Park TTC stations are all near the Upper Beaches (Victoria Park and Main are wheelchair accessible).  The stations include east/west subway trains, north and southbound buses. 

Streetcars  run along Queen Street East (route 501) and Kingston Road (routes 502 and 503) and Gerrard Street East (route 506),

Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416-393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416-393-4222.

Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416-481-5250.

Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999.

Non-Medical transportation for Seniors to important appointments can also be arranged with accompanyment through your local Home Instead office

Parks, Community Centres:

Fairmount Park Community Centre (at 1757 Gerrard St East, east of Coxwell) is partially accessible.  It offers adult fitness options like Palates, Yoga, Tai Chi, Swimming and Skating.  There is also a  Farm Market.  416 392-7060

Ted Reeve Community Arena is an indoor rink on Main Street at Gerrard St.  It was named after a Toronto Telegram sports writer, who was also a professional level athlete.

Norwood Park is a 1.6 hectare park near Gerrard Street East and Woodbine Avenue that features five outdoor tennis courts, a dog off-leash area, a wading pool and a children’s playground.braries:

Both theMain Street at 137 Main St (south of Gerrard) 416 393-7700 and the Danforth/Coxwellat 1675 Danforth Ave 416 393-7783 branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs.

 Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare:

The nearest hospital is Toronto East General Hospital, (at 825 Coxwell Avenue and Sammon Avenue) has an emergency department.  416 461-8272.

Bridgepoint Active Health (at 14 St. Mathews Road – Broadview Avenue and Gerrard Street) is newly renovated and focuses exclusively on research, care and teaching for people with complex health conditions.  416-416-8252.

Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, located at 3560 Bathurst Street (south of Wilson Avenue), is affiliated with University of Toronto and is a global leader in geriatric residential living, healthcare, research, innovation and education, with a special focus on brain health and aging. Founded in 1918 as the Jewish Home for Aged, Baycrest continues to embrace the long-standing tradition to improve the well-being of people. 416-785-2500.

Since 1980, the Ralph Thornton Centre (at 765 Queen Street East) has been offering programs ranging from arts, mediation, education, environment, social wellbeing and cooking.  The Centre’s namesake, Ralph Thornton, was a taxi driver and Riverdale community activist.  416-392-6810.

Woodgreen Community Care and Wellness for Seniors (at 444 Logan Avenue near Gerrard Street) offers supportive housing, meal programs, adult day programs , programs for persons living with Alzheimer’s, transportation to medical appointments and other outings.  Languages spoken are English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Filipino and  Vietnamese. 416-572-3575

East End Community Health Centre (at 1619 Queen Street East at Coxwell) provides Medical Services, Counselling/Psychotherapy, Physiotherapy, Nutrition, Client Support and Community Programs.  416 778-5858.

Did you know?

Dating back to 1888, East Toronto was an  incorporated community and the central street in the community was Main Street, running south from Danforth to Kingston Road. The main commercial centre of town was the intersection of Main and Lake View (now Main and Gerrard). During amalgamation with Toronto, Main Street was able to keep its name, since Toronto’s true main street was “Yonge“, explaining  why Toronto’s “Main Street” is not in the city centre.

Kingston Road’s name was given because it was the primary route used to travel from Toronto to the settlements east of it situated along the shores of Lake Ontario in the west end of Kingston and until 1908, was referred to as York Road.

In 1850 Charles Coxwell Small donated 3 acres of land to be used for St John’s Church, Berkeley.  A wooden church was built that year and cemetery was added three years later.  In 1893, the brick structure replaced the wooden one and the church was renamed St. John’s Norway Cemetery and Crematorium.

The first home of the exclusive Toronto Golf Club was built in the late 1800s on once abandoned farmland south of the railway tracks between Coxwell and Woodbine.  In 1888, the club had 35 members with annual dues of $5 each.  The club, now in Mississauga, is the third oldest golf club in North America.

Small’s Creek is a partially hidden waterway that alternates between being above and below grade until a short stretch near Gainsborough and Eastwood Roads, where it enters a storm drain which feeds into the lake near the Ashbridges Bay Treatment Plant.

Gerrard India Bazaar is the largest marketplace of South Asian goods and services in North America.  Located on Gerrard St. East  between Greenwood and Coxwell, there are more than 100 shops and restaurants representing the regional diversities of South Asian culture, food and music.

Todmorden Village

Senior Care services Todmorden Village
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Todmorden Village

About Todmorden Village

Home Instead Senior Care  provides in-home care for residents in Todmorden Village.

Todmorden Village is a residential community that runs along the crest of the Don Valley Ravine and Taylor Creek Park in Toronto.  Todmorden Mills is a historical site located within this community.

Todmorden Village Area Ammenities for Seniors

Transit:

Broadview, Chester and Pape TTC Stations are near Todmorden Village.  Broadview and Pape stations are wheelchair accessible) 

Buses run north from Broadview Station to the corner of Pottery Road (routes 8, 62, 87 and 100), but there is a very steep hill down to the Todmorden Mills area.  There is a shuttle bus from Broadview station, directly to Everygreen Brick Works, which is still quite a walk from Todmorden Mills. Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416 393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416 393-4222. Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416 481-5250. Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999. Non-Medical transportation for Seniors to important appointments can also be arranged with accompaniment through your local Home Instead office.

Parks, Community Centres:

Todmorden Mills Heritage Site (at 67 Pottery Road near Bayview Ave and east of the Don Valley Parkway) is a complex of historic buildings which were once part of the small industrial community of Todmorden.  Today the site consists of two historic millers’ homes dating from the early 19th century, the Brewery building and the recently renovated Papermill Theatre and Gallery. Adjoining the site is a 9.2 hectare wildflower preserve with walking trails exploring a number of natural habitats, including upland and bottomland forests, dry and wet meadows, swamp lands and a pond. It is partially wheelchair accessible.  Over the next few months, exciting changes are taking place inside the historic houses. News about the current renovations will be announced later this year. Senior admission (65 +) is $3.54.  The site is operated by the City of Toronto and is one of Toronto’s Historic Museums that participate in Toronto Public Library‘s Sun Life Financial Museum + Arts Pass program. With a valid adult library card, you can borrow a family pass good for any Toronto Historic Museum, at any of Toronto Public Library’s 99 branches. East York Community Centre (at 1081 1/2 Pape Ave south of Mortimer)is a fully accessible centre with an indoor pool, gym and weight room.  It offers programs for adults and seniors like Cardio for Older Adults, Pilates, Tai Chi, Yoga and Golf.  416 396-2880. Evergreen Brick Works (at 550 Bayview Avenue, south of Pottery Road and east of the Don Valley Parkway) is a former quarry and industrial site  that operated for nearly 100 years and provided bricks for well-known Toronto landmarks (Casa Loma, Osgoode Hall, Massey Hall, and the Ontario Legislature).  In fact, their bricks were of such good quality that they won prizes at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 and the Toronto Industrial Fair in 1894.  The area has  been converted into a city park with a series of naturalized ponds, while the buildings have been restored and opened as an environmentally-focused community and cultural centre by Evergreen, a national charity dedicated to restoring nature in urban environments.   There is also a weekly farmer’s market, a skating pond and a restaurant.  The park section is managed by the City of Toronto.  There is a regular shuttle bus service running daily from Broadview Subway Station and the facility is wheelchair accessible. 416 596-7670. Leaside Memorial Community Gardens (at 1073 Millwood Road and  Laird Drive) is the largest recreation centre in Leaside and  provides an indoor swimming pool,  ice rink, curling rink and large auditorium.  416 421-4944.

Libraries:

Todmorden Room (in the East York Community Centre at 1081 1/2 Pape Avenue) 416-396-3875,  Pape/Danforth (at 701 Pape Avenue) 416 393-7727, Danforth/Coxwell (at 1675 Danforth Avenue) 416 393-7783  and Leaside (at  165 McRae Drive) 416 396-3835)   branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs. 

Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare: 

The nearest hospital is Toronto East General Hospital (at 825 Coxwell Avenue and Sammon Avenue) has an emergency department.  416 461-8272. Bridgepoint Active Health (at 14 St. Mathews Road near Broadview Avenue and Gerrard Street) is the newly renovated hospital that has been internationally recognized for dedication to getting patients and their families living with complex health conditions back to their lives. Bridgepoint is the single largest organization in Canada to focus exclusively on research, care and teaching for people with complex health conditions.  416 416-8252

Westwood Health (at their new location – 959 Pape Avenue north of Westwood Avenue) offers Chiropractor, Acupuncture, Active Release Technique and Vestibular Rehab.  416 422-1515

Pape Medical Centre (at 1018 Pape Avenue south of Cosburn Avenue) is a wheelchair accessible walk-in clinic.  Languages spoken are English, Albanian and Turkish.  416-429-6668.

 Albany Medical Clinic (at 807 Broadview Ave and Pretoria Avenue) offers a walk in clinic, physiotherapy and medical diagnostics. 416-461-9471.

Did you know:

Todmorden Mills was a small settlement located in the Don River Valley in Toronto. It started out as a saw mill in the late 18th century and soon after was replaced by a grist mill. During the 1880’s, this mill was converted to steam power, resulting in the tall chimney that continues to be a landmark for the site.  It grew into a small industrial complex and village before becoming part of East York in the 20th century. The valley site is now occupied by the Todmorden Mills Heritage Museum and Arts Centre, which includes the museum, art gallery, a theatre and a forest preserve.

Dating back to 1888, East Toronto was an  incorporated community with a population of 19,849.  By 2006, the population rose to112,054. It amalgamated with Toronto in 1998.

Mortimer Avenue was possibly named for George Mortimer an Anglican Minister  in Thornhill, York Township or for his son Herbert Mortimer, first president of the Toronto Stock Exchange in 1861.  The street was originally called Gardener’s Raod because of the market gardens along it.

The Beaches

Senior Care services The Beaches
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

The Beaches

Named after the continuous stretch of sandy beach that comprises most of its southern border, this vibrant community in East Toronto has a history which dates back prior to our Confederation as a country and as far back as 1793.  Initially subdivided for Lieutenant Governor John Simcoe, the area and its local infrastructure were slowly built up by its initial owners into a cluster of small villages and townships.  A major government initiative built a connecting road between York (the name of Toronto at that time) and the Bay of Quinte in Kingston in the 1800s.  Kingston Road as it is now known, quickly became the primary and major artery connecting the City of Toronto from the east, (until latter replaced by Hwy 401 in the 1900s), are now represents the northern border of this community. 
As the small villages and encampments along the waterfront grew, the area became a popular waterfront destination for many in the 1800s.  By the 1870’s, The Beach had become the summer destination of choice for residents of Toronto and the surrounding area.  Street car service increased access to the area and to the waterfront of Lake Ontario.  The villages grew into Towns, and the City of Toronto eventually incorporated them into the City proper.  In 1910 to 1920, the local governments began to buy the land that many of the private and commercial recreational areas occupied. Property purchases and renovation work progressed slowly, but in 1932 the Beaches Park opened, and there has been no looking back since.  Growth and development in this area has continued and flourished to this date. 
The Beach contains a number of historic buildings and or sites that are either designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, or listed in the City of Toronto’s inventory of heritage buildings.  One of these landmarks includes Dr. William D. Young Memorial.  The memorial, located in Kew Gardens, includes a drinking fountain and is dedicated to Dr. William D. Young, a local physician who, in the era before universal health care, had devoted himself to the health and welfare of children of the neighbourhood.  Young was stricken with the flu while tending to the sick during an influenza epidemic and died almost penniless due to his voluntary work with the local children. 
The Beach Boardwalk is the premier tourist destination of the area.  Traversing Kew Beach, Woodbine Beach and Balmy Beach, it is 3.5km long, and has some spectacular scenery of Lake Ontario and local community.  There are many parks in it offering picnic tables, bike and roller-blade trails and sandy beaches.  Among the most popular parks, Kew Gardens remains one of the most prominent and most visited in the Beach neighbourhood.  The park stretches from Queen Street East to the Lakeshore at Kew Beach.  The park began as a private 20.7-arcre farm owned by Joseph Williams in the 1850s.  As more visitors from the city began visiting the lake front, he transformed his holdings into a tourist destination.  He setup a large park and built several recreation facilities, tenis courts, picnic areas, boating and swimming facilities  in 1879.  He also built his home on this site which still stands today and is home to the park’s caretakers.  Today, the park has many more amenities to offer such as a baseball diamond, a wading pool, and a hockey and lacrosse rink just to name a few. 
Definitely a very popular tourist destination in Toronto especially during the spring and summer months due to various events and festivals, the Beach is a destination worth exploring.  Among some of the famous festivals include Beaches International Jazz Festival that began back in 1989.  Celebrating over 26 years, this blossomed into a 10-day event that attracts millions of fans and makes a major contribution to promoting Canadian jazz excellence in Toronto and on the world stage.   
You will find more than 390 independent and specialty stores along the commercial district of Queen Street East.  The stores along Queen Street are known to change tenants quite often causing streetscapes to change from year to year, and often creating new shopping opportunities for frequent visitors.  The community is both warm and engaging for all visitors.

Scarborough Village

Senior Care services Scarborough Village
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Scarborough Village

About The Scarbourough Village

Home Instead Senior Care  provides in-home care for residents in Scarborough Village.

Scarborough Village , also known as Scarborough Heights or locally as MarkhamEglinton,  is a neighbourhood in the east end of Toronto.

The boundaries of Scarborough Village are Bellamy Road South to the west, Bethune Boulevard to the east, the CN railtracks north of Eglinton to the north, and Lake Ontario to the south.

Scarborough Village Area Ammenities for Seniors

Transit:

Kennedy Station is the nearest  TTC station, on the Bloor Danforth line.

Buses go along Scarborough  (route 86) and Morningside (route 116) and east along Eglinton from Eglinton Station (route 34). Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416 393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416 393-4222.

Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416 481-5250. Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999. Non-Medical transportation for Seniors to important appointments can also be arranged with accompaniment through your local Home Instead office.

Parks, Community Centres:

Scarborough Village Park Recreation Centre (at 3600 Kingston Rd near Markham Avenue) is a fully accessible, free community centre in the neighbourhood with courses for Adults 60+ like Quilting, Bunka, Paper Tole, Crocheting, Knitting, Country Crafts, Ballroom and Line Dancing and Choir. There are also games for Adults 55+ like Membership Card, Bingo, Shuffleboard, Euchre, Bridge, Dominos, Cribbage, Darts, Scrabble Shuffleboard and Texas Hold ‘Em.  416 396-4048.

Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities (at 629 Markham Rd and Warden Avenue) offers an Adult Day Program with social, recreational and therapeutic activities for seniors with Dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease, disabled adults and frail seniors who are socially isolated  (and their caregivers).  The program is in a group setting for part of the day and run by professional caring staff and volunteers .  SCHC helps to support and provide respite to family caregivers who provide day-to-day care and a friendly, secure environment.  Includes nutritious meals, snacks and transportation to and from the program.  416 847-4131.

Toronto. Parks, Forestry and Recreation – Scarborough District (at the Scarborough Civic Centre, 150 Borough Drive) offers recreation, arts, sports and fitness activities for all ages, and adapted programs (including pools) for people with disabilities and special needs.  416 338-4386.

Warden Woods Community Centre (74 Firvalley Court) offers a number of seniors programs like a Friendship Club (wellness and recreational activities to connect to community, stay active and increase social network while promoting optimal cognitive functioning, confidence & overall spirit);  I.R.I.E. Club (a lively social program connecting older adults from Caribbean communities for wellness workshop,  seminars, arts, crafts and organized trips); Tai Chi classes; congregate dining (opportunity for older adults with disabilities to have a meal with  nutritional and social support); Tamil and Bengali seniors recreation (culturally specific recreational programming); monthly free foot care community clinics;  assisted living and home help;  crisis intervention; caregiver support; homelessness prevention and HIV outreach programs; Meals on Wheels; outings and transportation services.  They also offer an Adult Day Program at their 63 Mack Ave location for older adults with Alzheimer’s or related Dementia to encourage independent living in the community).  416 694-1138.

Libraries:

Cedarbrae (at 545 Markham Rd,) 416 396-8850, Bendale (at 1515 Danforth Rd) 416 396-8910 and Guildwood (at 123 Guildwood Pkwy) 416 396-8872 branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs. 

Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare: 

The Scarborough Hospital is the nearest hospital and it operates two campuses, the General Campus (at 3050 Lawrence Ave. E) 416 438-2911 and the Birchmount Campus (at 3030 Birchmount Rd) 416 495-2400.  Both have emergency rooms.  Patient Programs for seniors include Acute Care for the Elderly, Geriatric Assessment and Intervention Network Clinic, Psycho-geriatric Outreach Program and Stroke Care.

Dawes Family Practice And Walk-In (at 2772 Danforth Ave) is part of the Comprehensive Healthcare Network.  416 690-1042.

Scarborough Golden Mile Walk-in Clinic (at 1880 Eglinton Avenue and Victoria Park, in the Golden Mile plaza, near No Frills) and offers walk in patient care.  416 285-7575.

Did you know?

In 1832,  Scarborough Village became the first community in the former Township of Scarborough to have its own post office. By 1856, Scarborough Village became a subdivision and by 1860, the area of Scarborough Village had its first completed brick schoolhouse.  By the 1890’s, a general store, a blacksmith shop, a store that sold farm accessories, and a large railway hotel were built in the area. The area only contained about a dozen dwellings. Scarborough was named after the English town of Scarborough, North Yorkshire in 1796 by Elizabeth Simcoe, who thought the Scarborough Bluffs reminded her of white cliffs near her home. 

Dentonia Park Golf Course (at 781 Victoria Park north of Danforth) is a city-owned, award-winning course that promotes itself as one of the finest and most challenging par 3 facilities in Ontario. It is perfect for beginners just learning the game or advanced players sharpening their short shots.   416 392-2558.

Sheppard Avenue was named after Joseph Sheppard who, in the 1800’s, owned 400 acres at what is now Sheppard and Yonge.  He and his family built a log cabin, mills, taverns and a general store on the site.

Lawrence Avenue was named after Jacob Lawrence who was owned a tannery on Yonge Street at that corner.

Named after Eglinton Castle in Scotland, Eglinton Avenue is the only street in Toronto that spans the entire city from east to west, crossing through every former city and borough.

In the mid-1800s, John Muir lived in Scarborough Village. He is the father of Alexander Muir, who wrote the song “The Maple Leaf Forever“.

Riverdale

Senior Care services Riverdale
This Home Instead Senior Care office serves the areas of Toronto East, including the communities of:

Riverdale

About Riverdale

Home Instead Senior Care  provides in-home care for residents in Riverdale. 

Riverdale‘s boundaries are the Don River to the west, Jones to the east, the Danforth to the north and Lake Ontario to the south.

This dense urban neighbourhood is a mosaic of multiculturalism with many neighbourhoods visible along its major arteries.  North Riverdale on the Danforth,  is well known for its large Greek population and concentration of Greek Restaurants and shops, while Gerrard Street East and parts of Broadview Avenue are home to a variety of Asian shops now commonly known as Chinatown East.  The southern part is known as the Studio District where several large corporate film studios extend from Queen East to the Lakeshore.  Trendy Leslieville has become an arts hub, with many artists choosing to run their studios from the various work-live lofts.

Riverside is a small neighbourhood within South Riverdale. Boundaries are the Don River to the west, Gerrard St. East to the north, Empire Avenue to the east and Eastern Avenue to the south.   It is  a mixed income and largely multicultural neighbourhood currently experiencing a trend of gentrification along Queen St. East and Broadview Ave and is becoming a district for independent design, furniture, and food retailers, as well as restaurants.

Riverdale Ammenities for Seniors

Transit:

Broadview and Chester and PapeTTC stations are north South Riverdale (Broadview and Pape are wheelchair accessible and include east/west subway trains, north and southbound buses). 

Streetcars run from Broadview Station east-west along King Street (504 Route) and Dundas (505 Route) and Gerrard (506 Carlton route runs from Main Street Station.  Buses head north and south from Pape Station. 

 Wheel-Trans provides door-to-door accessible transit service for persons with physical disabilities using accessible buses, contracted accessible and sedan taxis.  Their strict eligibility guidelines can be discussed via appointment by calling 416-393-4111.  Once eligibility is confirmed, reservations are at 416-393-4222. 

Toronto Ride provides door-to-door, assisted transportation to seniors 55+ and adults with disabilities who are not eligible for Wheel-Trans. This partnership of 14 not-for-profit agencies in Toronto can be reached at 416-481-5250. Seniors may be eligible for an Accessibility Parking Permit through the City of Toronto.  Inquire at 416 235-2999.

Parks, Community Centres:

Frankland Community Centre & Pool (at  816 Logan Ave, south of the Danforth) is a smaller facility located in Frankland School. 416-392-0749

Riverdale Park East, which is located south of the Danforth, is one of Toronto’s largest parks and has a swimming pool, rink, tennis courts, sports field, walking/running track, an ice rink, sports fields and access to the Don Valley Ravine with walking and biking trail along the Don River.   It also offers stunning views of the city scape and any local resident would tell you it’s the winter tobogganing and outdoor arena that makes it the best park in the winter.

Withrow Park is a 8.5-hectare park with an ice rink, wading pool, tennis courts, ball diamonds, volleyball courts, sports fields, and a leash-free area.  It was  created in the 1910’s  and is among Toronto’s large multi-purpose parks. The park goes from Logan Avenue to the West,  Carlaw Avenue to the east, Bain Avenue on the south and nd McConnell Avenue on the north. It hosts a weekly farmer’s market.

Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre is a large facility located at Jimmie Simpson Park at 870 Queen Street east.  It is a hub  is a hub for free recreation programming with tennis and basketball courts, a swimming pool and offers adult courses like Cardio Dance, Yoga and Palates as well as Muscle Conditioning classes for older adults focusing on building bone mass, muscular strength and endurance with no cardio component.  416 392-0751

Woodgreen Community Care and Wellness for Seniors (at 444 Logan Ave near Gerrard) offers supportive housing, meal programs, adult day programs,  transportation to medical appointments and other outings.  Languages spoken are English, Cantonese, Mandarin, Filipino and  Vietnamese. 416-572-3575.

Since 1980, the Ralph Thornton Centre (at 765 Queen Street East) has been offering programs ranging from arts, mediation, education, environment, social wellbeing and cooking.  The Centre’s namesake, Ralph Thornton, was a taxi driver and Riverdale community activist.  416-392-6810. ries:

Both the Pape/Danforth (at 701 Pape Avenue), Jones (118 Jones Avenue) 416 393-7715 and the Riverdale (at 370 Broadview Avenue near Gerrard Street) branches are wheelchair accessible and offer books, films, internet access and community-based programs.  Riverdale also offers bilingual (Chinese/English) programs and services.

Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare:

The nearest hospital is Toronto East General Hospital, located at 825 Coxwell Avenue (at Sammon Avenue) and has an emergency department.  416 461-8272. Community Care East York Inc. (CCEY) at 840 Coxwell Ave, Suite 303 offers among other things, programs related to Dementia support including adult day programs.  416-422-2026

Bridgepoint Active Health (at 14 St. Mathews Road, at Broadview Avenue and Gerrard Street) is the newly renovated hospital and single largest organization in Canada to focus exclusively on research, care and teaching for people with complex health conditions.  Called “House of Refuge” in 1860,and used for vagrants, the dissolute, the mentally challenged and renamed “Riverdale Isolation Hospital”in 1875, during the smallpox epidemic.  416-416-8252.

Albany Medical Clinic is located at 807 Broadview Ave (at Pretoria) 416-461-9471 and offers a walk in clinic, physiotherapy and medical diagnostics.

Did you know?

Toronto’s largest bridge, the Prince Edward Viaduct was built in 1918 and provided Riverdale with an important link to the City of Toronto.

Danforth Avenue was named after Asa Danforth, an American contractor  commissioned in 1799 to cut the Danforth but didn’t actually build it.

Danforth Music Hall was originally the Allen’s Danforth movie theatre, built in 1919 abd promoted as “Canada’s First Super-Suburban Photoplay Palace”.

The Royal Canadian Curling Club is located at Queen St. East on Broadview Avenue was originally built in 1907 by the Royal Canadian Bicycle Club.  .  Since 1953, they’ve focused exclusively on curling and feature six  sheets and hosts leagues for about 500 members.